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Oct. 31, 2019                                           Bob Rose, 510-282-7279

4-TIME GRAMMY WINNER DAVID HOLT, TOP BANJO ARTIST JOSH GOFORTH TO PLAY WHITE HORSE BLACK MOUNTAIN

Both Noted Storytellers, Holt & Goforth Will Feature Bluegrass Ole-Time Music in Holiday Concert Dec. 21

         BLACK MOUNTAIN, N.C.— David Holt, a four-time Grammy Award winner who has earned a gilded reputation as musician, storyteller, historian, television host and entertainer, and Josh Goforth, one of this country’s finest old-time and bluegrass music performers and storytellers, will combine their virtuosic sounds of guitar, banjo, fiddle, slide guitar, mandolin and a world of exciting rhythm, for a much anticipated concert at White Horse Black Mountain on Saturday, Dec. 21 at 8 p.m.

Tickets are priced at $22 in advance and $25 the day of the event.   Doors open at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 828-669-0816 or go to www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Holt, who hosts the PBS series David Holt’s State of Music featuring some of the region’s finest musicians, plays 10 acoustic instruments and has released numerous award-winning recordings of traditional mountain music and southern folktales.

For more than 30 years David also has been hosting the North Carolina PBS series, Folkways, which that takes the viewer through the Southern Mountains visiting traditional craftsmen and musicians. In addition, Holt currently hosts the PBS series Great Scenic Railway Journeys. Previously, he served as host of The Nashville Network’s Fire on the Mountain, Celebration Express and American Music Shop. He has been a frequent guest on Hee Haw, Nashville Now and The Grand Ole Opry. David can also be seen as a musician in the popular film, O Brother Where Art Thou.

In 2002, Doc Watson and David won two Grammy Awards for Best Traditional Folk Recording for Legacy, a three CD collection of songs and stories reflecting Doc Watson’s inspiring life story.

A native of Garland, Texas, Holt’s family moved to Pacific Palisades, Calif., while he was in junior high school. He recalls his early musical and storytelling influences: “I grew up in a family of informal storytellers, and there was plenty to tell about our wild and wooly Texas forefathers. Storytelling was just a natural part of family life for me. I never thought about telling stories in public until I began to collect mountain music and came across interesting and unusual anecdotes from mountain folks. I began to use these stories in concerts and realized the power storytelling holds.”

In 1975, Holt founded and directed the Appalachian Music Program at Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa, N.C.  It is the only program of its kind in which students study, collect and learn traditional music and dance.  Since 1981, Holt has pursued a full-time career in entertainment. Today, he brings to the concert stage the fun and spirit of old-time music and storytelling. An evening with David Holt offers tales, ballads and tunes told, sung and played on the banjo, slide guitar, guitar, harmonica, bones, spoons and jaw harp. 

Holt is a three-time winner of the Frets magazine readers’ poll for “best old-time banjoist.” In addition, Esquire Magazine selected Holt for its first “Annual Register of Men and Women Who Are Changing America” in 1984. Called the “the best of the new generation,” those chosen included such notables as Steven Spielberg, Sally Ride and Meryl Streep. All were selected for personal vision, originality and service to others.

Goforth attended East Tennessee State University to study music education, and to be a part of ETSU’s famous Bluegrass and Country Music Program. In 2000, he played fiddle for the movie, Song catcher, both onscreen and on the soundtrack. He has performed all over the United States as well as Europe and Asia. In 2000, 2003, and 2005, he was named Fiddler of the Festival at Fiddler’s Grove, making him the youngest ever 3-time winner. 

 “Josh Goforth is a super star in waiting,” said noted music producer Hugh Sturgill.  “He shows the same promise I saw in Ricky Skaggs, Tony Rice, Jerry Douglas and Vince Gill in the 70s.”  

White Horse Black Mountain (105 Montreat Rd.) is a 215-seat music and arts venue that has staged more than 2,500 concerts and other events during its 10-year history. It offers state- of-the-art sound, cabaret-style (table) seating, and bar/concession area that serves beer, wine, Kombucha, Shanti Elixers, soft drinks and snacks. 

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